Beethoven: "Razumovsky" Quartets (Op.59, Nos.1-3) (2005)

Beethoven

Tokyo String Quartet

The Beethoven boom continues apace. No other composer so completely defines our concert life in each important genre – symphonies, concertos, and chamber music – and no other is subject to such ongoing scrutiny of his life and his art. Indeed, with the passing of time and a deeper knowledge of historical incident has come increased appreciation of his breathtaking, path-breaking innovation. Perceived as unique in his own day, he remains so in ours. 
Beethoven’s early training with Christian Gottlob Neefe affirmed his abilities; the first published notice he received, in 1783, applauded a “youthful genius” (Thayer’s Life of Beethoven, p. 66) and Neefe praised him as “unquestionably now one of the foremost pianoforte players” (Thayer, op. cit, p. 113). His inevitable migration from Bonn to Vienna – the Imperial capital and artistically pre-emminent – came in 1792, when he was 21 years old. 
Haydn, we know, taught him briefly in a mutually unsatisfying relationship, and there also was tutelage with Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, Kapellmeister at St. Stephen’s Cathedral and the city’s foremost teacher of counterpoint, and with Imperial Kapellmeister Antonio Salieri. But nothing learnt from these men can directly account for the transformations he later wrought in how music was composed and how it was perceived. Although primarily known as keyboard virtuoso at first, as a soloist and improviser second to none Beethoven quickly won acknowledgement as the composer who would inherit the mantle of Classicism – nobody assimilated as fully the ethos of Mozart and Haydn. Yet, from the start of his Viennese career, he set about consciously to undermine the premises and practices of his artistic progenitors and redefine music’s most fundamental assumptions.
Beethoven arrived in the Austrian capital with a modest portfolio; his earliest Viennese works, however, already displayed those characteristics we associate with the mature composer: his “longrange control over bold harmonic action,” (Grove, Beethoven entry, p. 379), including melodic concision, rhythmic vigor, and rigorous motivic development.

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Tokyo String Quartet

Regarded as one of the supreme chamber ensembles of the world, the Tokyo String Quartet has captivated audiences and critics alike since it was founded 42 years ago. Performing over a hundred concerts worldwide each season, the quartet has a devoted international following that includes the major capitals of the world and extends to all four corners, from Australia to Estonia to Scandinavia and the Far East. The Tokyo Quartet has served on the faculty at the Yale School of Music since 1976 and is quartet-in-residence at New York’s 92nd Street Y. Deeply committed to coaching young string quartets, the musicians regularly conduct master classes throughout NorthAmerica, Europe and Japan.
 Officially formed in 1969 at the Juilliard School of Music, the Tokyo String Quartet traces its origins to the Toho School of Music in Tokyo, where the founding members were profoundly influenced by Professor Hideo Saito. Soon after its formation, the quartet won First Prize at the Coleman Competition, the Munich Competition and the Young Concert Artists International Auditions. An exclusive collaboration with Deutsche Grammophon (more than 40 landmark recordings) firmly established it as one of the world’s leading quartets. The ensemble now records for harmonia mundi usa and has recently concluded an acclaimed cycle of Beethoven’s complete string quartets.

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Beethoven: "Razumovsky" Quartets (Op.59, Nos.1-3) (2005)

Beethoven

Tokyo String Quartet

Producer: Robina G. Young
Recording Engineer: Brad Michel
Recording location: Skywalker Sound California USA
Recording Software: Pyramix
Recording Type & Bit Rate: DSD64

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HMU907423_24: Beethoven: "Razumovsky" Quartets (Op.59, Nos.1-3)
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Tracks.
1.
Quartet VII In F major, Op.59, No. 1 - I. Allegro
Beethoven
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2.
Quartet VII In F major, Op.59, No. 1 - II. Allegretto vivace e sempre scherzando
Beethoven
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3.
Quartet VII In F major, Op.59, No. 1 - III. Adagio molto e mesto
Beethoven
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4.
Quartet VII In F major, Op.59, No. 1 - IV. Theme russe: Allegro
Beethoven
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5.
Quartet VIII In E major, Op.59, No. 2 - I. Allegro
Beethoven
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6.
Quartet VIII In E major, Op.59, No. 2 - II. Molto adagio
Beethoven
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7.
Quartet VIII In E major, Op.59, No. 2 - III. Allegretto
Beethoven
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8.
Quartet VIII In E major, Op.59, No. 2 - IV. Finale: Presto
Beethoven
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9.
Quartet IX In C major, Op.59, No. 3 - I. Introduzione: Andante con moto - Allegro vivace
Beethoven
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10.
Quartet IX In C major, Op.59, No. 3 - II. Andante con moto quasi Allegretto
Beethoven
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11.
Quartet IX In C major, Op.59, No. 3 - III. Menuetto: Grazioso
Beethoven
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12.
Quartet IX In C major, Op.59, No. 3 - IV. Finale: Allegro molto
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