Goodbye Pork Pie Hat (2009)

Ch. Mariano, Dieter Ilg, Hammerstein, Kern

Charlie Mariano, Dieter Ilg

All of Europe loved this sound: The saxophone, the passion, the irascible pain, the tears of lava - the Mariano sound. This unmistakable sound has accompanied us for decades in jazz bands, rock bands, world music bands, Shelly Manne’s cool jazz quintet, and in the red hot music of Charles Mingus, Pork Pie, Embryo, The United Jazz & Rock Ensemble, Eberhard Weber’s Colors, Rabih Abou-Khalil, Konstantin Wecker, The Karnataka College and in countless other small, intimate, highly personal bands.

The smallest, most intimate was the duo with Dieter Ilg – just saxophone and bass. Almost too private to reach any outside ears. Too intensive to simply check it off and file it away as just an ordinary musical experience. Charlie Mariano and Dieter Ilg were brotherly partners for almost a decade, on and off the stage, until just very recently when Mariano passed away. “Later, this duo will be called legendary”, a music magazine wrote five years ago. “Later” is today.

It is easy to understand what is happening in this music, just impossible to put into words. Already with the first few notes of “Randy”, a door is opened into a room where the listener has rarely entered. Every note has its own meaning and its own life as does every breath, every silent note, and every reverberation. Seemingly without transition, the alto sax breaks from a meditative into an expressive, almost furious state, volcanically rising into “the high Himalayan region” as Dieter Ilg once expressed it. He always found the duo constellation with Charlie Mariano to be both hard and easy at the same time: It was easy to make musical sense with Charlie without any distractions, worrying who the band leader was. It was hard as a bassist “to be challenged every second being perceived as the harmony and rhythm accompanying instruments – like the piano and drums- while playing the four strings of the bass. To fill everything that there was to fill and not to say what was not to be said.” Here Dieter Ilg plays the necessary, the possible, the correct. The inspiration never lets up – gentle and burning.

It is beautiful that this legendary (now historical) duo has been finally captured – pure, vibrant and complete with the technical devotion of a sound enthusiast. A kind of epilogue – a finale and epitaph in every respect – “Goodbye Pork Pie Hat” performed in the chapel of Solitude Palace near Stuttgart. The music comes from a different sounding hall – a farewell hall. Charles Mingus composed this half blues, half ballad piece as a musical obituary to Lester Young, the great saxophone hero of swing, bop and cool jazz. Many musicians of Charlie Mariano’s generation spent their life playing only bop and cool jazz. For Mariano, however, the music of his early years was more of a stepping-stone to other musical worlds - into Europe and India. Even more moving is that he returned here to the musical funeral oration of the bassist Mingus, in the essential reduction to sax and bass. When Charlie tells us the story of Lester on the sax, he tells the story of all great saxophonists. Also his own.

- Hans-Jürgen Schaal, liner notes

Read more

Dieter Ilg

Bassist Dieter Ilg is regarded today as one of a handful of European musicians who make their unmistakable musical style a valuable contribution to the projects they work on. Whether it is as a internationally well-respected sideman or as band leader of his own ensembles: Ilg always combines the quality of the bass as a musical foundation with a graceful ease and expression that is rarely heard on a technically difficult instrument such as the double bass. It is sometimes assumed that there are two kinds of bass players: those who “groove” and accompany (serving mainly as a rhythmic presence) or those who – freeing themselves of the serving role – strive to explore their artistic heights as a soloist (displaying their versatility as virtuoso improvisers). Unlike many Dieter Ilg combines the two ends of this spectrum. His versatile, individual, passionate and tasteful voice has become a valuable contribution to the international jazz arena. At the age of six Dieter Ilg – then an experienced recorder player (in kindergarten) – learned to play the violin and the viola before deciding to play the double bass at the age of thirteen. After four years of lessons at the music school in his home town Offenburg Ilg went on searching for new teachers. He studied with Norbert Brenner (solo double bass player of the SWR Orchestra Baden-Baden) and later on attended Jazz courses in Burghausen, Remscheid and Tübingen, working with a wide variety of instructors and professionals. From 1981 until 1985 Ilg refined his practical skills as well as his theoretical knowledge with Prof. Wolfgang Stert at the Musikhochschule Freiburg. Winning the Fulbright scholarship then enabled him to study at the Manhattan School of Music in New York City (1986/1987). At this time he was already skilled enough to understand the art of musical structure as it was conveyed to him by such masters as Eddie Gomez, Ron McClure, Rufus Reid, Adelhard Roidinger and Miroslav Vitous. It was also then that he made his further experiences on the stage as a member of the Joe Viera Sextett (1981 – 1984) as well as with his first trio-project, co-founded with Klaus Ignatzek. Not before long he had built up a busy schedule performing with such players as Bobby Watson or David Liebman. It was Liebman who significantly influenced Ilg’s decision to stay on in New York for a while when he invited him to join the John Coltrane Memorial Concert in NYC in January 1987. The future began to look exciting. Seizing the moment Ilg founded his first Trio with guitarist John Schröder and drummer Wolfgang Haffner shortly after returning from New York. He also became a member of the Randy Brecker Quintet (1987-89). Suddenly things were on a roll and he was awarded with the Baden-Württemberg Jazz Prize in 1988. The press said: The brilliance and expression of his tone, the originality in the concept of his ensemble and his individual approach to harmony are fascinating. Regular performances with the WDR Big Band (recordings with Bob Brookmeyer, John Abercrombie, Danny Gottlieb, Charlie Mariano, Peter Erskine, Nguyen Le, Vince Mendoza and others), frequent tours in europe (for example a tour of Spain with Bennie Wallace ) and a new line up to his own trio – this time including pianist Marc Copland – is what followed. These collaborations resulted in the production of three CD’s featuring drummers Bill Stewart, Ralph Penland and Jeff Hirshfield. Since 1991 Ilg had toured with Germany’s renowned Jazz formation, the Mangelsdorff/Dauner Quintet. The Goethe Institute sent him round the world playing with Christof Lauer and the working relationship with Copland had resulted in evermore interesting facets of sound. Ilg ventured into worldmusic and jazz-rock with the French-Vietnamese guitarist Nguyên Lê and drummer Danny Gottlieb, also the list of performances as a sideman kept growing longer and longer. He developed a passion for culinary pleasures of a certain standard, which now has become a personal character trade. He gained a reputation as a chef and goutier, his recommendations for restaurants were highly esteemed and a “dinner at Dieter Ilg’s” achieved cult status. When this became known to the magazine Jazzthing it offered him a regular column. Remaining faithful to his home soil Ilg organized new projects as for example with Charlie Mariano. In 1998 he had already produced the album “Savannah Samurai” with the charismatic saxophonist – this was followed by a number of tours with Charlies band.?Out of this relationship grew their magnificent duo, which remained an impressive combination until the end (Charlie Mariano died in June 2009). “Wondrous music full of depth and poetry” (Jazzdimensions). In 2013 Till Brönner and Dieter Ilg decided to explore a new duo constellation, festivals and tours are spread over the whole year of 2014 too. Another event is a quintet, formed by Till Brönner and classical trumpet star Sergei Nakariakov with concerts in 2013 and upcoming in 2015. The renowned bassist also played concerts in 2013 and 2014 with finnish piano player Iiro Rantala and polish violinist Adam Baldych at Montmartre Jazzfestival in Copenhagen and the Jazzfestivals in Gdansk.

photo: from booklet 'Goodbye Pork Pie Hat'

Charlie Mariano

Charlie Mariano (born November 12, 1923 in Boston) was an American jazz alto saxophonist. He played with one of the Stan Kenton big bands, Toshiko Akiyoshi, Charles Mingus, Eberhard Weber, the United Jazz and Rock Ensemble and numerous other notable musicians.

His career can easily be divided into two. Early on he was a fixture in Boston, playing with Shorty Sherock (1948), Nat Pierce (1949-50) and his own groups. After gigging with a band co-led by Chubby Jackson and Bill Harris, Mariano toured with Stan Kenton's Orchestra (1953-55) which gave him a strong reputation. He moved to Los Angeles in 1956 (working with Shelly Manne and other West Coast jazz stars), returned to Boston to teach in 1958 at Berklee and the following year had a return stint with Kenton. After marrying Toshiko Akiyoshi, Mariano co-led a group with the pianist on and off up to 1967, living in Japan during part of the time and also working with Charles Mingus (1962-63).

The second career began with the formation of his early fusion group Osmosis in 1967. Known at the time as a strong bop altoist with a sound of his own developed out of the Charlie Parker style, Mariano began to open his music up to the influences of folk music from other cultures, pop and rock. He taught again at Berklee, traveled to India and the Far East and in the early '70s settled in Europe. Among the groups Mariano has worked with have been Pork Pie (which also featured Philip Catherine), the United Jazz and Rock Ensemble and Eberhard Weber's Colours. Charlie Mariano's airy tones on soprano and the nagaswaram (an Indian instrument a little like an oboe) fit right in on some new agey ECM sessions and he also recorded as a leader through the years for Imperial, Prestige, Bethlehem, World Pacific, Candid, Regina, Atlantic, Catalyst, MPS, CMP, Leo and Calig among others.

photo: from booklet 'Goodbye Pork Pie Hat'

Read more

Goodbye Pork Pie Hat (2009)

Ch. Mariano, Dieter Ilg, Hammerstein, Kern

Charlie Mariano, Dieter Ilg

    NativeDSD Listener

This album is quite good, textured, layered, and detailed. Very relaxing. This DSD thing is the very best of my habits. NativeDSD - What an incredible web site.

John

Goodbye Pork Pie Hat (2009)

Ch. Mariano, Dieter Ilg, Hammerstein, Kern

Charlie Mariano, Dieter Ilg

Digital Converters: Playback Designs Pinot Analog to DSD 256 Converter
Mastering Engineer: Dirk Sommer - Direct Analog to DSD 256 Stereo Transfer of the Analog Master Tape
Notes: This music was released as a LP (vinyl) but never on a SACD, now it is available as a DSD Download at NativeDSD
Producer: Birgit Hammer-Sommer and Dirk Sommer
Recording Engineer: Birgit Hammer-Sommer and Dirk Sommer
Recording Type & Bit Rate: Analog

Quality & Channel Selection
Select Quality and Channels to calculate the price below More info

Quality

Channels

  • Binaural
  • Stereo
  • Multi
  • ST+MCH
Included in any DSD purchase is access to the base DSD64 resolution. All DSD capable units will be able to play DSD64.
Album Download duration price
sds0014: Goodbye Pork Pie Hat
00:44:10   Select quality & channels above
Tracks.
1.
Randy
Ch. Mariano
00:08:54   Select quality & channels above
2.
Greenland
Dieter Ilg
00:05:23   Select quality & channels above
3.
Plum Island
Ch. Mariano
00:07:42   Select quality & channels above
4.
All The Things You Are
Hammerstein,Kern
00:07:54   Select quality & channels above
5.
Savannah Samurai
Dieter Ilg
00:07:20   Select quality & channels above
6.
Goodbye Pork Pie Hat
Ch. Mariano
00:06:57   Select quality & channels above

User Reviews

Other albums from this label