Martin Peudargent

Capella '92, Fritz Heller, Rabaskadol

19.9933.49
Clear
Original Recording Format: DSD 256

More than 400 years ago, the musician and composer Martin Peudargent (ca. 1510 – before 1594) was employed at the ducal court of Jülich-Kleve. He left an extensive oeuvre, which has only recently become widely accessible. His first collection of motets, the »Liber Primus sacrarum cantionum quinque vocum, quae vulgo Moteta vocantur«, was printed in Düsseldorf in 1555. On the title page, Peudargent is described as »Illustrißimi Ducis Iuliae, Cliviae, Bergiae etc. Musicus«. From a later source it appears that he originated from Huy in the Netherlands, in the prince-bishopric of Liège. He may therefore have been educated in the city of Liège. In later years he maintained close relations with Liège musicians such as Adamus de Ponta. The motet collection is the earliest proof of Peudargent’s employment at the court of Jülich-Kleve. In an earlier record, dating from 1532, he is described as »magister Martin Peudargent« and owner of a house in the ducal seat of Kleve. Peudargent was probably employed at the local convent school, whose choir sung frequently at court.

The present recording focuses on the »State or Homage motets« from Peudargent’s second collection (1555), in which reference is made to the ducal house. The recording also includes works from the first and second motet books, as they would have been performed in the day-to-day routine of a court »Kapelle«: settings of biblical texts, especially psalms, and free texts according to the church year.

Tracklist

1.
Misericordia Jesu Christi - Wind Ensemble
03:02
2.
Te Deum Patrem
02:31
3.
Miset me vivens pater I. pars
01:33
4.
Cibavit eum II. pars
02:30
5.
Parvulus natus est nobis
03:45
6.
Pater noster
04:45
7.
Ave Maria
03:32
8.
Cor meum conturbatum est- Wind Ensemble
02:38
9.
Cor meum conturbatum est
02:49
10.
Amici mei
03:21
11.
Beatus, qui intelligit
02:24
12.
Dominus conservet
02:00
13.
Terram nunc pede
03:31
14.
En foencunda Aquila
04:12
15.
Rebus in utilibus
02:18
16.
Spartam praecipue
02:11
17.
Jubilate Domino
03:07
18.
Ingrediamini
03:39
19.
Irrogat omnipotens
02:06
20.
Misericordia Jesu Christi
03:14
21.
Dux optatus adest
02:14
22.
Canzon Il n'est plaisir
02:37
23.
Laudate Dominum
04:06

Total time: 01:08:05

Additional information

Artists

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Genres

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Label

Qualities

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Channels

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Original Recording Format

Composers

Mastering Engineer

Jos Boerland

Producer

Jos Boerland

Recording Engineer

Jos Boerland

Recording location

Salvatorkirche Aachen on June 19, 2006 & Johanneskerk Oosthem on February 22-25, 2007

SKU

ACDHN016-2

Release Date April 4, 2018
SKU ACDHN016-2

Press reviews

SACD.net

The intriguingly named Martin Peudargent (meaning ‘Little Money’ in French), was born around 1510 in Huy in the Prince-Archbishopric of Liège. From the mid-1530s he is recorded as owning a house in Düsseldorf, where he probably worked as a master of music at a convent school. Starting in the late 1540s, he worked for Duke Wilhelm V of Jülich-Kleve-Berg in Düsseldorf, becoming Kapellmeister and eventually going blind before his death, apparently still in service to the Duke, between 1589 and 1594. He published three books of motets, two of which appeared in 1555 (the third of them with only a few works from his hand), which were all circulated widely throughout German-speaking lands during his lifetime. He also published a collection of chansons of which only the bass part-book survives. The second motet book contains several so-called ‘state motets’ written for official celebrations (births, baptisms, birthdays, weddings and anniversaries), praising Duke Wilhelm and members of his family, and it is from this collection that musicologists have inferred when Peudargent started working for the Ducal Court at Dusseldorf.

Peudargent was a true son of the great Flemish tradition of vocal polyphony, but with some openness to Italian elements typical of Flemish and German musicians of his time. His music thus has features similar to the works of his great and slightly younger contemporary, Orlandus Lassus, who worked at the even grander Court of the Elector of Bavaria in Munich. The mostly state motets recorded on this DSD release show Peudargent to have been an accomplished polyphonist with a fine sense of aural texture and colour.

These features are accentuated by these lavishly mixed vocal and instrumental performances, which accord with the famous depictions of Lassus directing the Munich Court ensemble.
Capella ’92 is a 17-voice choir of men and women. Being so large and consisting entirely of adults, the choir has quite a weighty sound. This detracts slightly from the vivacity of the performances. Capella ’92 is joined by a mixed wind and string ensemble.

The album’s cover illustration shows Peudargent and some of his musicians at Düsseldorf, three of whom are playing Renaissance violins. These instruments became increasingly popular as consort instruments at German courts between the 1540s and 1600. Here, their crisp, reedy sound, quite unlike the rounder, more powerful notes of the Baroque violin and cello, distinctively colours Rabaskadol’s sound, which includes cornetts, shawms, sackbuts, curtals, an organ and a spinet (but no lutes or harps).

Some of the motets and an arrangement of a French chanson as a canzona attributed to Peudargent in a Venetian collection do not feature Capella ’92 and are performed by Rabaskadol alone, either with just the instruments or with the group’s two attractively youthful and lithe singers, a soprano and a tenor, joining the instruments. These last performances are perhaps the most captivating of all.

Voices and instruments perform very well, with excellent ensemble from the disciplined (and very Dutch-sounding) choir and superior technical and stylistic assurance from the instruments. The shawms and curtals are especially engaging, although the cornetts are a little less polished than we expect from the best European (i.e. non-British) players these days. All this makes for a rich treat for the ears, which is accentuated by the first-rate sound engineering. Choir, instruments and the two vocal soloists blend warmly and naturally in the detailed and slightly resonant acoustic of the Church used as the recording venue, which sounds as if it incorporates as much wood as stone. In multi-channel mode, the placement of each voice or instrument is precise with much refined detail to overcome the potential for aural crowding from too much richness and variety of sounds. In stereo mode, the sound stage is almost as clear and the balance, clarity and presence remain excellent. This type of aurally complex recording is an excellent demonstration indeed of the superior qualities of the DSD medium.

Rating: Performance 4 out of 5 Stars, Stereo Sonics: 4.5 out of 5 Stars, Multichannel Sonics: 5 out of 5 Stars.

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