Works for violin solo

Liza Ferschtman

19.9927.49
Clear
Original Recording Format: DSD 64

 

Two centuries separate the lives of Johann Sebastian Bach and Eugène Ysaÿe, two centuries of differences and similarities. In the first half of the 18th century, J.S. Bach developed into a compositional genius with an enormous repertoire. In the beginning of the 20th century, Ysaÿe emerged as a world- famous violinist. He also composed, but less than his illustrious predecessor.As children, both received violin les- sons from their fathers, Bach in his birthplace Eisenach and Ysaÿe in his native Liege. Bach was equally drawn to the violin, the harpsichord and the organ. Ysaÿe was obsessed with the one instrument. Bach earned his living writing whatever music his employers required of him. From the time of his appointment as cantor at the Lutheran Thomaskirche in Leipzig in 1723, he wrote principally church music. Before that, he had been kapellmeisterat the court of Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen. As it was not custom- ary for sacred music to be heard at this Protestant court, Bach was expected to write secular music.
From 1717 to 1723, he composed violin concertos, The Well-Tempered Clavier, pieces for solo organ, harpsichord and cello, and sonatas and partitas for the violin. Most of his younger contemporaries, including his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, considered his music old-fashioned. In doing so, they appar- ently neglected The Well-Tempered Clavier, in which Bach experimented with keys, new sonorities and daring modulations from one key to another.
The new tuning system for keyboard instruments, called “equal temperament,” in which all semitones are equidistant, opened previously unheard of possibilities for Bach. The innovations it gave rise to, found their way even into his works for solo string instrument. Many of the arpeggios and various double stops in those pieces employed such sonorities, from which Bach could deviate into an array of keys. This would not have been possible before the new tuning system. 

Tracklist

1.
Sonate no.1 in g minor BWV 1001- Adagio
04:11
2.
Sonate no.1 in g minor BWV 1001- Fuga. Allegro
05:23
3.
Sonate no.1 in g minor BWV 1001- Siciliana
02:30
4.
Sonate no.1 in g minor BWV 1001- Presto
03:22
5.
Sonate no. 1 op. 27 no. 1- Grave, Lento assai
06:39
6.
Sonate no. 1 op. 27 no. 1- Fugato, Molto moderato
05:02
7.
Sonate no. 1 op. 27 no. 1- Allegretto poco Scherzoso, Amabile
04:38
8.
Sonate no. 1 op. 27 no. 1- Finale con brio, Allegro fermo
03:07
9.
Partita no. 3 in E major BWV 1006- Preludio
03:23
10.
Partita no. 3 in E major BWV 1006- Loure
03:38
11.
Partita no. 3 in E major BWV 1006- Gavotte en Rondeau
02:46
12.
Partita no. 3 in E major BWV 1006- Menuet I en II
03:47
13.
Partita no. 3 in E major BWV 1006- Boureee
01:15
14.
Partita no. 3 in E major BWV 1006- Gigue
01:45
15.
Sonate no. 2 op. 27 no. 2- Obsession, Prelude, poco vivace
02:38
16.
Sonate no. 2 op. 27 no. 2- Malinconia, Poco lento
02:53
17.
Sonate no. 2 op. 27 no. 2- Danse des Ombres, sarabande
04:52
18.
Sonate no. 2 op. 27 no. 2- Les Furies, Allegro furioso
03:21

Total time: 01:05:10

Additional information

Artists

Genres

,

Label

Qualities

Channels

, ,

Original Recording Format

Cables

Siltech

Digital Converters

DCS AD/DA

Composers

,

Microphones

Sonodore

Producer

Bert van der Wolf

Recording Engineer

Bert van der Wolf

Recording location

Galaxy Studios, Mol, Belgium

Recording Type & Bit Rate

DSD64

Recording Software

Pyramix

SKU

CC72351

Release Date August 8, 2014
SKU CC72351

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