Dance!

Cécile Huijnen, Marieke Grotenhuis

19,9927,49
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Original Recording Format: DSD 64
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When Béla Bartók wanted to pursue his own musical direction after the conservatory, he found more inspiration in Hungarian folk music. Together with his friend Kodály he traveled across the Hungarian landscape, which included parts of what is now Romania, recording and collecting folk music.

In 1906, he published his first bundle, making his research on folklore become his biggest passion. Even in Turkey and Africa he explored all kinds of music, collecting over 10.000 folk songs during those years. Bartók deliberately incorporated lots of these folk influences from Hungary into his own compositions.

However, he found his own personal style, marking his signature on a lot of modern music. For example, in his six-piece cycle titled Romanian Folk Dances, which was initially composed for piano solo. Bartók simplified the rhythmical irregularities of the original melodies and enriched the harmonic structure to his own liking.

Cécile Huijnen – Violin
Marieke Grotenhuis – Accordion

Tracklist

1.
Romanian Folk Dances op. 7
06:16
2.
Slavonic Dance op. 46, no. 1
03:20
3.
Humoresque op. 101 no. 7
02:54
4.
Adagio
05:36
5.
Three Hungarian Dances- Moderato assai e molto espressivo
02:33
6.
Three Hungarian Dances- Allegro
01:01
7.
Three Hungarian Dances- Presto con fuoco
01:13
8.
Abodah (a Yom Kippur melody)
06:22
9.
from Hungarian Dances- no. 6, Allegro
02:42
10.
from Hungarian Dances- no. 7, Allegretto
02:02
11.
from Hungarian Dances- no. 1, Allegro Molto
03:31
12.
from Histoire du Tango- Cafe 1930
06:39
13.
from Histoire du Tango- Nightclub 1960
05:41
14.
Souvenir
05:15

Total time: 00:55:05

Additional information

Label

SKU

CC72683

Qualities

,

Channels

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Artists

,

Composers

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Genres

,

Cables

Siltech

Digital Converters

dCS

Mastering Engineer

Bert van der Wolf

Mastering Equipment

Avalon Acoustic

Microphones

Sonodore

Original Recording Format

Producer

Bert van der Wolf

Recording Engineer

Bert van der Wolf

Recording location

Galaxy Studios, Mol, Belgium

Recording Software

Merging

Recording Type & Bit Rate

DSD64

Release Date March 18, 2016

Press reviews

Crescendo 9 out of 5

On this album the program is well balanced, diverse, and festive. The accordion has its place.

Note the Romanian Dances by Bartok that specifically work with this instrument. Overall, we listened to this disc with pleasure; the duo is attractive as is the repertoire. Huijnen plays with a bright sound, remarkable accuracy and displays much virtuosity and is well served and accompanied by Marieke Grotenhuis.

However, one might expect more boldness in the transcripts and in arrangements where the accordion is a little too much the accompanist. We appreciate the energy in Brahms’ Hungarian Dances, but it misses the last shot in the tempo to really light the fire!

Luister 10 out of 5

It’s a small piece yes, but of the brilliant sort. Huijnen is shining as a soloist here. Of course, driven happily by her partner. This album makes you smile.

De Telegraaf Weekenide

‘They are a great team and next to vivacious, all is well taken care of in every detail.

De Volkskrant 4 out of 5

It works well. You hear violinist Cécile Huijnen addressing her primal power. In a seductive way she spins around accordionist Marieke Grotenhuis. She whips her up and turns her back to her, being naughty, as the most beautiful girl in town, who knows what she is worth.

 

De Gelderlander 5 out of 5

Huijnen and Grotenhuis are a perfect match when it comes to technique, appearance and especially musicality. And let’s be honest: a violin simply combines better with the accordion.

Effortlessly, the ladies immerse us in the melancholy of the Romanian Folk Dance opus 7 by Bartók and the Slavonic Dance opus 46, no. 1 by Dvorák. And the title Dance! is of course not for nothing. Sometimes there is hopping (as in Dvorák’s Humoresque), sultry rubbed against each other (Café 1930 by Piazzolla) or enthusiastically swinging (Nightclub 1960 by Piazzolla).

It is great that Cécile Huijnen and Marieke Grotenhuis also regularly insert moments of peace and reflection (for example Abodah by Bloch, once composed for Yehudi Menuhin, and the Adagio by Kodály). The final takes a different approach: Souvenir by Kupkovic starts rashly and almost immediately offers fireworks à la Paganini. Huijnen sprinkles lavishly with glissandi here. 

Breathtaking!

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