The Organ In A Russian Home

Olesya Rostovskaya

23.9937.49
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Original Recording Format: DXD

It is generally believed that organ music appeared in Russia about 150 years ago with the opening of the conservatoires in St Petersburg and Moscow. Friedrich Ladegast’s organ, which was used on this recording and is believed to be the oldest surviving organ in Russia, dates back to that era. In reality it was not merely 150 years but, rather, a thousand years ago that organ music entered Russia culture together with other forms of Byzantine art.

Organ has never been used by the Russian Orthodox Church, although for centuries it has been part of of ordianry life in the palaces of tsars and emperors, in the homes of nobility and of wealthy and educated people. It also became popular in folk art, with wandering buffoons but in 16th and 17th centuries their form of art was banned and their instruments destroyed.

At various times organists from Italy, Flanders and elsewhere came to Russia. They brought their music with them, settled and worked in the country. Owners of organs also loved to perform music. Home concerts became a refined form of entertainment and a significant element of social life.

Professional organ music emerged in Russia early in 19th century when composing music was no longer seen merely as entertainment but as an art form in its own right. Friedrich Ladegast’s organ, the oldest instrument in Russia (built in 1868) was commissioned by Distinguished Citizen Vassili Khludov who organised concerts in his home. During the Soviet period, no one could afford an organ at home and Soviet school of organ performance originated in the Moscow Conservatoire which housed Ladegast’s organ from 1898 to 1957. Today, when electronic organs have become quite affordable organ music can be performed at home once again.

Ladegast’s organ has been housed in the Russian National Museum of Music since 1998 which is where this album was recorded.

Tracklist

1.
Ceremonial music of the Byzantine Emperors
03:07
2.
Alla Trinita Beata
00:34
3.
Saltarello from the Tuscan Manuscript
01:05
4.
Almande
01:48
5.
Almande prynce
01:50
6.
Variations on Ach du feiner Reiter
10:46
7.
Menuet
01:21
8.
Bourree
00:45
9.
Menuet from Les Plaisirs de Versailles
01:03
10.
Polonoise from Singende Muse am der PleiBe
00:50
11.
Aria of Papageno from The Magic Flute
03:19
12.
Prelude and Fugue BWV 559
02:55
13.
Fugue
02:44
14.
Priere sans paroles
04:37
15.
Innocent Sincerity
01:11
16.
Spanish Marionettes
01:09
17.
A Timid Confession
02:14
18.
Prelude -pastoral from The Russian Album
02:57
19.
Great Litany from Liturgia Domestica
02:38
20.
Supplication Litany from Liturgia Domestica
05:13
21.
Choral in G
05:32

Total time: 00:57:38

Additional information

Label

SKU

AM180007

Qualities

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Channels

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Artists

Composers

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Genres

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Cables

Gotham

Digital Converters

Hapi, Merging Technologies

Headphones

Stax SR 407 with SRM 006tS tube amplifier

Microphones

Neumann KM140, Izmeritel M-101 with Oktava-Electron-Design P200 electronics, modified MicW N201 and M215

Original Recording Format

Producer

Olesya Rostovskaya

Recording Engineer

Alexey Pogarskiy

Recording Location

Russian National Museum of Music in Moscow, Russia

Recording Software

Pyramix, Version 11, Merging Technologies

Recording Type & Bit Rate

DXD

Speakers

Focal CMS 50

Release Date July 12, 2019

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