Dvorak: Quartet No.12 – Smetana: Quartet No.1

Tokyo String Quartet

23.9931.49
Clear
Original Recording Format: DSD 64

During the nineteenth-century Czech National Revival, it was the symphonic poem and opera that dominated musical proceedings. The former, with its programmatic clout, and the latter’s ability to embrace politics and pomp made for nimble agents in the nation’s search for its soul. Bedrich Smetana and Anton.n Dvorak, its prime musical movers and shakers, dedicated their lives to these totemic art forms, while the string quartet trailed quietly behind. Intimate and domesticated, its four-way dialogue was seemingly not for the national stage. But as Dvorak and later Smetana demonstrated, their music was not always about the grand gesture. 
These two composers are now inextricably linked, but during the latter part of the 19th century, Smetana and the younger Dvorak were considered total opposites. Smetana was the progressive figure, embracing Liszt and Wagner’s musical innovations and making them apparently indigenous. He was supported by a loyal band of followers called the mladoceši [young Czechs]. Dvorak, on the other hand, was seen as conservative, aligned with the staroceši [old Czechs]. His success in neighbouring German-speaking territories and his friendship with Brahms likewise did him few favours back at home. 
To the outside world, such infighting was irrelevant and Dvorak was as much the quintessence of the Czech sound as Smetana. And it was in that spirit that Jeannette Thurber, the president of the National Conservatory of Music in America, invited Dvorak to New York in June 1891. Dvorak’s Slovansk. tance [Slavonic Dances] had done incredibly well in America and by offering him a new post at the Conservatory, Thurber hoped to provide not only a famous musician for her students but also one renowned for embracing a national style. It was just what was needed, Thurber felt, having always wanted America to have a musical idiom of its own. A generous salary secured Dvorak’s services in December 1891 and he arrived in New York on 26 September 1892.

Tracklist

1.
String Quartet No.12 in F Major Op. 96 - I. Allegro ma non troppo
09:45
2.
String Quartet No.12 in F Major Op. 96 - II. Lento
07:13
3.
String Quartet No.12 in F Major Op. 96 - III. Molto vivace
04:05
4.
String Quartet No.12 in F Major Op. 96 - IV. Vivace
05:41
5.
String Quartet No.1 in E Minor - I. Allegro vivo appassionato
07:08
6.
String Quartet No.1 in E Minor - II. Allegro moderato a la Polka
05:25
7.
String Quartet No.1 in E Minor - III. Largo sostenuto
08:14
8.
String Quartet No.1 in E Minor - IV. Finale: Vivace
05:44

Total time: 00:53:15

Additional information

Artists

Mastering Engineer

Brad Michel

Genres

,

Label

Qualities

Channels

, ,

Original Recording Format

Composers

,

Producer

Robina G. Young

Recording Engineer

Brad Michel

Recording location

Richard Bisher Center, Bard College, Annandale on Hudson, New York

Recording Type & Bit Rate

DSD64

Recording Software

Pyramix

SKU

807429DI

Release Date July 7, 2014
SKU 807429DI

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

harmonia mundi 70 albums

Related products

Currency
Cart