Tchaikovsky - Symphony no. 5 and Slavonic March op. 35 (2010)

Tchaikovsky

Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin

Yutaka Sado

After completing the Third Symphony (1875) and the Fourth Symphony (1878), Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky did not turn to writing another symphony for 10 years. Although the composer resumed work on this form in 1885 in the Manfred Symphony, he did not include it in the numbered series, since it belonged to the genre of programme music. (The second piece on the recording, Marche Slave [Slavonic March] was written shortly before the Fourth Symphony as an occasional work for a benefit concert on behalf of the victims of the Turkish- Serbian War.) It was only after his first European tour in April 1888, when he conducted his own works and received the long awaited appraisal in Berlin, Paris and London, that he felt the energy to write a new symphony. Nonetheless, work on it was arduous and slow at the start. On May 30 he wrote to his patroness, Nadezhda von Meck, that he was about to “squeeze a symphony from my benumbed brain”. He seems to have overcome this minor crisis very quickly, however, for the first draft of the work was already completed by June 22. The composer finished the orchestration on August 14 and writes contentedly to his friend and patroness: “I may say that this symphony does not take a back seat to the earlier ones.”

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Yutaka Sado

Yutaka Sado was born in Kyoto (Japan) and attended the Kyoto City University of the Arts. In 1987 he studied with Leonard Bernstein and Seiji Ozawa at the Tanglewood Music Festival and became Bernstein’s assistant during his concert tour with the Schleswig- Holstein Festival Orchestra. He won the Premier Grand Prix of the 39th International Competition for Young Conductors Besançon in 1989 and later the first prize in the Leonard Bernstein International Competition (1995). Sado assisted Bernstein and Michael Tilson Thomas in founding the Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo (Japan), where he appeared as permanent conductor and guest conductor. In 1993 Sado was appointed chief conductor of the Orchestre des Concerts Lamoureux; he was soon able to tie in the orchestra’s reputation with the legendary era of Igor Markevitc

Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin

For more than 65 years the Deutsches Symphonie- Orchester Berlin (DSO Berlin) has distinguished itself as one of Germany’s leading orchestras. The number of renowned Music Directors, the scope and variety of its work, and its particular emphasis on modern and contemporary music, makes the ensemble unique. It was founded in 1946 as the RIAS-Symphonie-Orchester by the broadcasting station in the American sector of Berlin. In 1956 the orchestra was renamed the Radio Symphonie-Orchester Berlin (RSO Berlin), and in 1993, to avoid confusion in Berlin’s newly reunited cultural landscape, the orchestra decided to relinquish its familiar name in favour of its present one.

Ferenc Fricsay became the orchestra’s first Music Director. He set the standard and defined the repertoire. The orchestra’s sound was characterized by transparency, structural clarity and plasticity. It quickly became well known for its commitment to 20th century music, and its ability to attract first-rate conductors. In 1964, Lorin Maazel took on the artistic responsibility for the orchestra. He was succeeded by Riccardo Chailly (1982-89), Vladimir Ashkenazy (1989-99), Kent Nagano (2000-06) and Ingo Metzmacher (2007-10). Since the start of the 2012-13 season the 34-year-old Ossetian conductor Tugan Sokhiev is DSO Berlin’s new Music Director. He has already held the title of Music Director Designate since the beginning of the 2010-11 season.

The Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin and its history have become emblematic of the democratic and cultural renewal of Germany following the defeat of National Socialism and the end of World War II. That is how the orchestra has been perceived at its concerts in Berlin and on tours throughout Germany and the rest of Europe, North and South America, and in the Near, Middle and Far East. Its groundbreaking radio and recording productions have further solidified this image. In 2011 the orchestra was awarded a Grammy Award for the Best Opera Recording.

bio & photo: from booklet 38116 (Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin with cellist Nicolas Altstaedt, Channel Classics)

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Tchaikovsky - Symphony no. 5 and Slavonic March op. 35 (2010)

Tchaikovsky

Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin

Producer: Martin Sauer
Recording Engineer: Rene Möller
Recording location: Jesus Christus Kirche, Berlin
Recording Type & Bit Rate: DSD64

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CC72356: Tchaikovsky - Symphony no. 5 and Slavonic March op. 35
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Tracks.
1.
Symphony no. 5 in e minor, op. 64 - Andante - Allegro con anima
Tchaikovsky
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2.
Symphony no. 5 in e minor, op. 64 - Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza
Tchaikovsky
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3.
Symphony no. 5 in e minor, op. 64 - Valse- Allegro moderato
Tchaikovsky
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4.
Symphony no. 5 in e minor, op. 64 - Finale- Andante maestoso - Allegro vivace
Tchaikovsky
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5.
Slavonic March, op. 31
Tchaikovsky
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