Dvorak Symphony No. 7 in D minor (2009)

Dvorak

Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra Amsterdam

Yakov Kreizberg

Prague, Budapest and Vienna. Three metropolises within the same country, the Austro-Hungarian double monarchy, with Vienna as the capital of the Habsburg part, and Prague as that of the historic kingdom of Bohemia. But as Bohemia was actually an Austrian province, Prague was subordinate to Vienna. This would evolve into a source of increasing frustration and political tension. After all, following the 1867 ‘Ausgleich’ (= compromise), in which the double monarchy was split into both an Austrian and an independent Hungarian part – to be sure, under the same king – many Czechs thought it time for Bohemia to achieve a similar status. However, the Habsburgers refused categorically to cooperate, especially as the indigenous Germans, who formed the second largest ethnic group in Bohemia after the Czechs, feared they would lose their privileged position. Therefore, alongside diplomatic campaigns, the Czechs concentrated increasingly on developing their own cultural identity during the following years. Thus, the Czech ‘rebirth’ was most especially a cultural renaissance intended as compensation for their lack of politicalinfluence.

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Yakov Kreizberg

Yakov Kreizberg was a naturalized American conductor and pianist, born in Russia with the name Yakov Bychkov. A piano prodigy at age 5, he began composing by 13 and took up conducting lessons with Ilya Musin around the same time. When he emigrated to the United States in 1976, he was unable to bring his compositions with him, so out of frustration with Soviet policies, he gave up composing entirely and dedicated himself to conducting full-time.

Once settled in the United States, Kreizberg entered the Mannes College The New School for Music, where he studied with his brother, conductor Semyon Bychkov. (Kreizberg adopted his mother's maiden name shortly after graduation, to differentiate himself from his brother). Following graduate work at the University of Michigan with Gustav MeierKreizberg studied with Erich LeinsdorfSeiji Ozawa,Leonard Bernstein, and Michael Tilson Thomas, becoming the latter's assistant at the Los Angeles Philharmonic Institute. In 1985, he returned to Mannes College to direct the school's orchestra and also conducted the New York City Symphony's concerts.

Having dual careers in conducting orchestral concerts and opera, Kreizberg served as general music director of the United Municipal Theaters of Krefeld-Mönchengladbach and as conductor of the Niederrheinische Sinfoniker. At the Berlin Comic Opera, he oversaw productions of standard repertoire as well as revivals of forgotten operas, and conducted many heavily attended concerts. He went on to conduct operas at Glyndebourne, the Canadian Opera Company, the English National Opera,Chicago Lyric Opera, and the Royal Opera House. His concert activities included performances with the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, and the London Symphony Orchestra, where he conducted Mahler's Symphony No. 2, "Resurrection," to critical acclaim. Additionally, Kreizberg appeared in the United States with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the San Francisco Symphony, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, and the New York Philharmonic.

After 2003, Kreizberg was chief conductor and artistic adviser of the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra and the Netherlands Chamber Orchestra, as well as principle guest conductor of theVienna Symphony Orchestra. He recorded for Decca and PentaTone Classics. Yakov Kreizberg died on March 15, 2011, in Monaco at age 51, following a long illness.

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Dvorak Symphony No. 7 in D minor (2009)

Dvorak

Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra Amsterdam

    'altogether most enjoyable and recommendable release'

Yakov Kreizberg’s admirable performance of Dvorak’s 7th symphony is a refreshingly straightforward one, with sensibly chosen tempi for each of the four movements. The debt to Brahms is never overplayed and the fiery first movement has considerable forward thrust. The lovely slow movement (Poco adagio) allows appreciation of the polished playing of the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra, particularly the winds and solo horn. The Finale is played with muscular strength and vigour bringing this satisfying reading of Dvorak’s finest symphony to an exultant close. Many would consider The Golden Spinning Wheel to be the best of Dvorak’s late symphonic poems, and when played without cuts, as here, it is undoubtedly the most substantial and compelling of these imaginative pieces. Kreizberg's evocative and energetic performance does full justice to the work and the events of the narrative that are graphically depicted in Dvorak’s wonderful music. He allows the glorious melodies of the lyrical sections to unfold naturally and relishes the drama of the exciting faster sections of the piece. These recordings were made in the spacious acoustic of the orchestra’s home, the Beurs van Berlage, Yakult Hall, Amsterdam, the symphony in November 2006 and The Golden Spinning Wheel in March 2008. Both are up to PentaTone’s usual exacting standards, making this an altogether most enjoyable and recommendable release.

Graham Williams[read full review]

Dvorak Symphony No. 7 in D minor (2009)

Dvorak

Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra Amsterdam

Producer: Job Maarse
Recording Engineer: Sebastian Stein, Matthijs Ruijters
Recording location: Beurs van Berlage, Yakult Hall, Amsterdam
Recording Software: Merging
Recording Type & Bit Rate: DSD64

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PTC5186082: Dvorak Symphony No. 7 in D minor
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Tracks.
1.
Symphony No. 7 - Allegro maestoso
Dvorak
00:10:37   Select quality & channels above
2.
Symphony No. 7 - Poco Adagio
Dvorak
00:09:47   Select quality & channels above
3.
Symphony No. 7 - Scherzo - Vivace
Dvorak
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4.
Symphony No. 7 - Finale - Allegro
Dvorak
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5.
Zlaty kolovrat Op. 109 (The Golden Spinning Wheel - Das Goldene Spinnrad)
Dvorak
00:28:18   Select quality & channels above

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